Musings from our Members
If you own a horse, then you know the inexplicable connection you have with him, the way you know his heart, know his peculiarities, his likes and dislikes, and the way that you know that he, too, knows these things about you.
Member Carolyn Hall submitted a beautiful story about her horse.  Take a look…

Evening feed time in my barn is often quite entertaining… My horse Sam is at liberty around the barn to walk up and down the center aisle. He keeps an eye(s) on me while I am fixing dinner feed buckets, he at times will hang his head over the wall looking at me; if that is not enough to get my attention, he will work to unlatch the door and open the door (so he can enter to nibble the hay stack or sneak a nibble from a bucket that is all mixed).  If the latch is snapped and will not come undone, he will change his efforts to backing up across the aisle- tap, tap, tap- small step by step, using his hind quarters to close the tack room door (which is usually open to listen to the radio and for the cat to come and go). In all of his maneuvers, he continues to keep his eye(s) on me without waver, hoping he will get me to look at him, (it always brings a chuckle from me), his beautiful brown eyes framed  with white sclera and chestnut lashes, ears attentively forward are so intent, asking, ready yet?  After a bit, he is off to dance with the wheel barrow, still keeping his eyes on me he will back up to the wheel barrow handles – tap, tap, tap –  hior just one handle between his hind legs, then, the sideways shift… just enough to make the steel supports move a little bit  on the concrete,  making the loud scraping noise, reminding me he is still waits hooves sound on the concrete floor as he positions himself just so, hind legs in between the handles ing… Repeating a little to the left, pause, a little to the right, the odd music will  continue… all the while never taking his eyes off what I am doing, until I enter the aisle way. Carefully disengaging his hind legs,  he then will depart his partner, the wheelbarrow, to lead the way to his stall, and as the feed is poured into the pan, he shifts his weight, one foot to the other, the dish set  on the hay, a mouth full is taken and he lifts the left front hoof, content…